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General News of Thursday, 30 April 2015

Source: Cameroon Tribune

Communication consulting firm molds project for the sector

The communication consulting firm housed on the first floor of a building located in downtown Yaoundé is currently working on a business journal. What is left is a last advertisement and will be ready to serve the client.

The promoter practice has been in the profession for almost a quarter century he confessed, "the most exhilarating thing is that you start with an abstract idea of a concrete project. Then you transform the client’s project into a reality".

Communication Consulting firm in or advertising agency, in terms of the law N ° 2006/018, December 29, 2006 governing advertising in Cameroon is defined as: "any legal person acting on behalf of an advertiser, the preparation of a strategy of advertising communication and follow-up of its operationalization, irrespective of the nature and objectives".

In the field of communication, consulting firms abound. This section of the ministry according to estimates by the Ministry of Communication controls this activity sector and issue approvals for its practice.

In addition to the communication sector, consulting and design offices are found in several other sectors of activity, buildings and public works, taxation, telecommunications, accounting, management, law, audit, etc.

In practice, the roles and tasks differ depending on whether one speaks of studies or advice. "The role of a research firm is limited to the completion of a feasibility study, an environmental study or market study whose results are operated by the client.

On the other hand, the consulting firm offers and makes on behalf of his client, a project. The consulting firm tells you how he sees the feasibility of your project and can sometimes bring the customer to accept this proposal", explains Jean-Claude Bilana, responsible for cabinet-council.

Study cabinets and consultancy firms are required to provide expertise not available internally (case of a company or a Government), in order to have an objective look and innovative idea in a particular area.

This is the case of the Crédit foncier du Cameroon (CFC), which has just launched a notice for expression of interest to recruit architectural and engineering firms justifying a 'proven expertise' in the construction industry.

This structure aims to be a directory of approved providers, willing to put their expertise at the service of its customers at a lower cost.

The aim, inter alia, is to combat the informal economy by making accessible expertise professionals. Firms selected at the end of the bid on May 15 must make architectural and technical studies of the projects submitted to the financing of EFA and economic and financial feasibility studies projects.

The construction sector is part of the areas where the expertise of study cabinet and Council is indispensable to the implementation of various infrastructure: road, bridge, school, wells, etc. but the quality of the work requested is not always the expectations.

Because they are primarily companies and for the most part, belong to the category of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Their profession is governed by sectors of activity.

In the field of communication, it is the Government that sets out the conditions of entry and exercise, including through the requirements of the law of 2006 on advertising.

National expertise also competes in this sector, with that from abroad. Thus, for some studies, the Government has had to appeal to international firms. Maas Telecom (US Office), for the renewal of the mobile licences granted recently to Orange and MTN Cameroon, Ernst & Young for the audit of the Justin Sugar Mills, in the context of the re-orientation of the sugar complex of Batouri which led to the recruitment of a new investor, etc.

The exercise of the profession, like all others, is not without difficulties. Apart from the chaff which meets the good grain, proponents of studies and Commission firms, face the difficulties same as those of the Cameroonian SMEs: financing.

This should be added to the difficulty of acquisition of contracts and payment delays that sometimes require structures having pre-financed some work, to shut down shops.